Air Conditioning Sales Leads- Telemarketing and AC Refrigerant

Published: 20th May 2010
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AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING TELEMARKETING -- Locally and Nationally >> Fast, effective Sales Lead Generation and Appointment Setting for your AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING BUSINESS via Local and National Telemarketing.

>> COLD CALLING on Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, etc., POTENTIAL AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING ACCOUNTS!...and then securing Sales Appointments and Sales Leads!

+ Live Operator and Voice Blasting formats.

+ The residential telemarketing is protected by Do Not Call Law adherence.

AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING TELEMARKETING -- Locally and Nationally >> Fast, effective Sales Lead Generation and Appointment Setting for your AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING BUSINESS via Local and National Telemarketing.

>> COLD CALLING on Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, etc., POTENTIAL AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING ACCOUNTS!...and then securing Sales Appointments and Sales Leads!

+ Live Operator and Voice Blasting formats.

+ The residential telemarketing is protected by Do Not Call Law adherence.

~> To find out more about our successful Residential and Commercial AIR CONDITIONING & AIR DUCT CLEANING TELEMARKETING-Cold-Calling Campaigns!>> please contact:

Mr. Ed Kinon- director of call center operations at ED'S SURVEY SERVICE 1-866-464-4940 ~ www.appointmentsleads.com ~ ~ ~

~~ Air Conditioning & Air Duct Cleaning Telemarketing Works- Let Us Make It Work For You ~~ CALL TODAY! 1-866-464-4940



Refrigerants

Main article: Refrigerant



"Freon" is a trade name for a family of haloalkane refrigerants manufactured by DuPont and other companies. These refrigerants were commonly used due to their superior stability and safety properties. Unfortunately, evidence has accumulated that these chlorine-bearing refrigerants reach the upper atmosphere when they escape. Once the refrigerant reaches the stratosphere, UV radiation from the Sun cleaves the chlorine-carbon bond, yielding a chlorine radical. These chlorine atoms catalyze the breakdown of ozone into diatomic oxygen, depleting the ozone layer that shields the Earth's surface from strong UV radiation. Each chlorine radical remains active as a catalyst unless it binds with another chlorine radical, forming a stable molecule and breaking the chain reaction. CFC refrigerants is common, but decreasing usage include R-11 and R-12. In light of these environmental concerns, beginning on November 14, 1994, the Environmental Protection Agency has restricted the sale, possession and use of refrigerant to only licensed technicians, per Rules 608 and 609 of the EPA rules and regulations;[5] failure to comply may result in criminal and civil sanctions. Newer and more environmentally-safe refrigerants such as HCFCs (R-22, used in most homes today) and HFCs (R-134a, used in most cars) have replaced most CFC use. HCFCs in turn are being phased out under the Montreal Protocol and replaced by hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) such as R-410A, which lack chlorine. Carbon dioxide (R-744) is being rapidly adopted as a refrigerant in Europe and Japan. R-744 is an effective refrigerant with a global warming potential of 1. It must use higher compression to produce an equivalent cooling effect.

The external section of a typical single-room air conditioning unit. For ease of installation, these are frequently placed in a window. This one was installed through a hole cut in the wall.

The internal section of the above unit. The front panel swings down to reveal the controls.

[edit] Reverse-cycle

Wiki letter w.svg This section requires expansion.

For more details on this topic, see Air conditioning#Heat pumps.

[edit] Types of air conditioner equipment

[edit] Window and through-wall units



Room air conditioners come in two forms: unitary and packaged terminal PTAC systems. Unitary systems, the common one room air conditioners, sit in a window or wall opening, with interior controls. Interior air is cooled as a fan blows it over the evaporator. On the exterior the air is heated as a second fan blows it over the condenser. In this process, heat is drawn from the room and discharged to the environment. A large house or building may have several such units, permitting each room be cooled separately. PTAC systems are also known as wall split air conditioning systems or ductless systems.[6] These PTAC systems which are frequently used in hotels have two separate units (terminal packages), the evaportive unit on the exterior and the condensing unit on the interior, with tubing passing through the wall and connecting them. This minimizes the interior system footprint and allows each room to be adjusted independently. PTAC systems may be adapted to provide heating in cold weather, either directly by using an electric strip, gas or other heater, or by reversing the refrigerant flow to heat the interior and draw heat from the exterior air, converting the air conditioner into a heat pump. While room air conditioning provides maximum flexibility, when cooling many rooms it is generally more expensive than central air conditioning.

[edit] Evaporative coolers

Main article: Evaporative cooler



In very dry climates, evaporative coolers, sometimes referred to as swamp coolers or desert coolers, are popular for improving comfort during hot weather. This type of cooler is the dominant cooler used in Iran, which has the largest number of these units of any country in the world, causing some to referring to these units as "Persian coolers."[7] An evaporative cooler is a device that draws outside air through a wet pad, such as a large sponge soaked with water. The sensible heat of the incoming air, as measured by a dry bulb thermometer, is reduced. The total heat (sensible heat plus latent heat) of the entering air is unchanged. Some of the sensible heat of the entering air is converted to latent heat by the evaporation of water in the wet cooler pads. If the entering air is dry enough, the results can be quite comfortable; evaporative coolers tend to feel as if they are not working during times of high humidity, when there is not much dry air with which the coolers can work to make the air as cool as possible for dwelling occupants. Unlike air conditioners, evaporative coolers rely on the outside air to be channeled through cooler pads that cool the air before it reaches the inside of a house through its air duct system; this cooled outside air must be allowed to push the warmer air within the house out through an exhaust opening such as a open door or window.[8]



These coolers cost less and are mechanically simple to understand and maintain.



An early type of cooler, using ice for a further effect, was patented by John Gorrie of Apalachicola, Florida in 1842. He used the device to cool the patients in his malaria hospital.

[edit] Absorptive chillers

Main article: Absorption refrigerator

[edit] Portable air conditioners

Question book-new.svg

This article needs references that appear in reliable third-party publications. Primary sources or sources affiliated with the subject are generally not sufficient for a Wikipedia article. Please add more appropriate citations from reliable sources. (March 2010)

Please help improve this article by expanding it. Further information might be found on the talk page. (May 2010)



Portable air conditioners are movable units that can be used to cool a specific region of building in a modular fashion, not requiring permanent installation. Most portable air conditioners are refrigeration based rather than evaporative[citation needed], and it is this type that is described in this section



All refrigerated type portable air conditioners require exhaust hoses for venting. Through this process of air intake, cooling and venting, air is continually cycled through the unit until the room reaches the desired temperature setting. Also, the refrigerant works to not only cool the air but also dehumidify air in the room, owing to the temperature decrease in the air resulting in saturation of the water content that can be suspended in the air, resulting in condensation, when the air is returned to the room, the air will be reheated without this additional water content.[9]. The water loss rate is sufficiently high to require collection or drainage. The exact conditions for the condensation of the water from the air can be estimated using a Psychrometric chart for air at room pressure.

[edit] Single hosed units



A single hosed unit has one hose that runs from the back of the portable air conditioner to the vent kit where hot air can be released. A typical single hosed portable air conditioner can cool a room that is 475 sq. ft. (45 sq meters) or smaller and has at most a cooling power of 12,000 BTUs.

[edit] Dual hosed units



Dual hosed units are typically used in larger rooms. One hose is used as the exhaust hose to vent hot air and the other as the intake hose to draw in additional air (usually from the outside). These units generally have a cooler power of 12,000-14,000 BTUs and cool rooms that are around 500 sq. ft. The reason an intake hose is needed to draw in extra air is because with higher BTU units, air is cycled in large amounts and hot air is expelled at a faster rate. This creates negative air pressure in the room, and the intake hose stabilizes the room's air pressure.

[edit] Split units



Portable units are also available in split configuration, with the compressor and evaporator located in a separate external package and the two units connected via two detachable refrigerant pipes, as is the case with fixed split systems. Split portable units are superior to both single and dual hosed mono-portable units in that interior noise and size of the internal unit is greatly reduced due to the external location of the compressor, and no water needs to be drained from the internal unit due to the exterior location of the evaporator.



A drawback of split portable units compared with mono-portables is that a surface exterior to the building, such as a balcony must be provided for the external compressor unit to be located.



Unlike window ACs the split AC does not have an option of exchange of indoor and outdoor air.

[edit] Heat and cool units



Some portable air conditioner units are also able to provide heat by reversing the cooling process so that cool air is collected from a room and warm air is released. These units are not meant to replace actual heaters though and should not be used to cool rooms lower than 50 °F (10 °C).

[edit] Central air conditioning



Central air conditioning, commonly referred to as central air (U.S.) or air-con (UK), is an air conditioning system which uses ducts to distribute cooled and/or dehumidified air to more than one room, or uses pipes to distribute chilled water to heat exchangers in more than one room, and which is not plugged into a standard electrical outlet.



With a typical split system, the condenser and compressor are located in an outdoor unit; the evaporator is mounted in the air handler unit. With a package system, all components are located in a single outdoor unit that may be located on the ground or roof.



Central air conditioning performs like a regular air conditioner but has several added benefits:



* When the air handling unit turns on, room air is drawn in from various parts of the building through return-air ducts. This air is pulled through a filter where airborne particles such as dust and lint are removed. Sophisticated filters may remove microscopic pollutants as well. The filtered air is routed to air supply ductwork that carries it back to rooms. Whenever the air conditioner is running, this cycle repeats continually.



* Because the condenser unit (with its fan and the compressor) is located outside the home, it offers a lower level of indoor noise than a free-standing air conditioning unit.



[edit] Mini (small) duct, high velocity



A central air conditioning system using high velocity air forced through small ducts (also called mini-ducts), typically round, flexible hoses about 2 inches in diameter. Using the principle of aspiration, the higher velocity air mixes more effectively with the room air, eliminating temperature discrepancies and drafts. A high velocity system can be louder than a conventional system if sound attenuators are not used, though they come standard on most, if not all, systems.



The smaller, flexible tubing used for a mini-duct system allows it to be more easily installed in historic buildings, and structures with solid walls, such as log homes. These small ducts are also typically longer contiguous pieces, and therefore less prone to leakage. Another added benefit of this type of ducting is the prevention of foreign particle buildup within the ducts, due to a combination of the higher velocity air, as well as the lack of hard corners.



Refrigerants

Main article: Refrigerant



"Freon" is a trade name for a family of haloalkane refrigerants manufactured by DuPont and other companies. These refrigerants were commonly used due to their superior stability and safety properties. Unfortunately, evidence has accumulated that these chlorine-bearing refrigerants reach the upper atmosphere when they escape. Once the refrigerant reaches the stratosphere, UV radiation from the Sun cleaves the chlorine-carbon bond, yielding a chlorine radical. These chlorine atoms catalyze the breakdown of ozone into diatomic oxygen, depleting the ozone layer that shields the Earth's surface from strong UV radiation. Each chlorine radical remains active as a catalyst unless it binds with another chlorine radical, forming a stable molecule and breaking the chain reaction. CFC refrigerants is common, but decreasing usage include R-11 and R-12. In light of these environmental concerns, beginning on November 14, 1994, the Environmental Protection Agency has restricted the sale, possession and use of refrigerant to only licensed technicians, per Rules 608 and 609 of the EPA rules and regulations;[5] failure to comply may result in criminal and civil sanctions. Newer and more environmentally-safe refrigerants such as HCFCs (R-22, used in most homes today) and HFCs (R-134a, used in most cars) have replaced most CFC use. HCFCs in turn are being phased out under the Montreal Protocol and replaced by hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) such as R-410A, which lack chlorine. Carbon dioxide (R-744) is being rapidly adopted as a refrigerant in Europe and Japan. R-744 is an effective refrigerant with a global warming potential of 1. It must use higher compression to produce an equivalent cooling effect.

The external section of a typical single-room air conditioning unit. For ease of installation, these are frequently placed in a window. This one was installed through a hole cut in the wall.

The internal section of the above unit. The front panel swings down to reveal the controls.

[edit] Reverse-cycle

Wiki letter w.svg This section requires expansion.

For more details on this topic, see Air conditioning#Heat pumps.

[edit] Types of air conditioner equipment

[edit] Window and through-wall units



Room air conditioners come in two forms: unitary and packaged terminal PTAC systems. Unitary systems, the common one room air conditioners, sit in a window or wall opening, with interior controls. Interior air is cooled as a fan blows it over the evaporator. On the exterior the air is heated as a second fan blows it over the condenser. In this process, heat is drawn from the room and discharged to the environment. A large house or building may have several such units, permitting each room be cooled separately. PTAC systems are also known as wall split air conditioning systems or ductless systems.[6] These PTAC systems which are frequently used in hotels have two separate units (terminal packages), the evaportive unit on the exterior and the condensing unit on the interior, with tubing passing through the wall and connecting them. This minimizes the interior system footprint and allows each room to be adjusted independently. PTAC systems may be adapted to provide heating in cold weather, either directly by using an electric strip, gas or other heater, or by reversing the refrigerant flow to heat the interior and draw heat from the exterior air, converting the air conditioner into a heat pump. While room air conditioning provides maximum flexibility, when cooling many rooms it is generally more expensive than central air conditioning.

[edit] Evaporative coolers

Main article: Evaporative cooler



In very dry climates, evaporative coolers, sometimes referred to as swamp coolers or desert coolers, are popular for improving comfort during hot weather. This type of cooler is the dominant cooler used in Iran, which has the largest number of these units of any country in the world, causing some to referring to these units as "Persian coolers."[7] An evaporative cooler is a device that draws outside air through a wet pad, such as a large sponge soaked with water. The sensible heat of the incoming air, as measured by a dry bulb thermometer, is reduced. The total heat (sensible heat plus latent heat) of the entering air is unchanged. Some of the sensible heat of the entering air is converted to latent heat by the evaporation of water in the wet cooler pads. If the entering air is dry enough, the results can be quite comfortable; evaporative coolers tend to feel as if they are not working during times of high humidity, when there is not much dry air with which the coolers can work to make the air as cool as possible for dwelling occupants. Unlike air conditioners, evaporative coolers rely on the outside air to be channeled through cooler pads that cool the air before it reaches the inside of a house through its air duct system; this cooled outside air must be allowed to push the warmer air within the house out through an exhaust opening such as a open door or window.[8]



These coolers cost less and are mechanically simple to understand and maintain.



An early type of cooler, using ice for a further effect, was patented by John Gorrie of Apalachicola, Florida in 1842. He used the device to cool the patients in his malaria hospital.

[edit] Absorptive chillers

Main article: Absorption refrigerator

[edit] Portable air conditioners

Question book-new.svg

This article needs references that appear in reliable third-party publications. Primary sources or sources affiliated with the subject are generally not sufficient for a Wikipedia article. Please add more appropriate citations from reliable sources. (March 2010)

Please help improve this article by expanding it. Further information might be found on the talk page. (May 2010)



Portable air conditioners are movable units that can be used to cool a specific region of building in a modular fashion, not requiring permanent installation. Most portable air conditioners are refrigeration based rather than evaporative[citation needed], and it is this type that is described in this section



All refrigerated type portable air conditioners require exhaust hoses for venting. Through this process of air intake, cooling and venting, air is continually cycled through the unit until the room reaches the desired temperature setting. Also, the refrigerant works to not only cool the air but also dehumidify air in the room, owing to the temperature decrease in the air resulting in saturation of the water content that can be suspended in the air, resulting in condensation, when the air is returned to the room, the air will be reheated without this additional water content.[9]. The water loss rate is sufficiently high to require collection or drainage. The exact conditions for the condensation of the water from the air can be estimated using a Psychrometric chart for air at room pressure.

[edit] Single hosed units



A single hosed unit has one hose that runs from the back of the portable air conditioner to the vent kit where hot air can be released. A typical single hosed portable air conditioner can cool a room that is 475 sq. ft. (45 sq meters) or smaller and has at most a cooling power of 12,000 BTUs.

[edit] Dual hosed units



Dual hosed units are typically used in larger rooms. One hose is used as the exhaust hose to vent hot air and the other as the intake hose to draw in additional air (usually from the outside). These units generally have a cooler power of 12,000-14,000 BTUs and cool rooms that are around 500 sq. ft. The reason an intake hose is needed to draw in extra air is because with higher BTU units, air is cycled in large amounts and hot air is expelled at a faster rate. This creates negative air pressure in the room, and the intake hose stabilizes the room's air pressure.

[edit] Split units



Portable units are also available in split configuration, with the compressor and evaporator located in a separate external package and the two units connected via two detachable refrigerant pipes, as is the case with fixed split systems. Split portable units are superior to both single and dual hosed mono-portable units in that interior noise and size of the internal unit is greatly reduced due to the external location of the compressor, and no water needs to be drained from the internal unit due to the exterior location of the evaporator.



A drawback of split portable units compared with mono-portables is that a surface exterior to the building, such as a balcony must be provided for the external compressor unit to be located.



Unlike window ACs the split AC does not have an option of exchange of indoor and outdoor air.

[edit] Heat and cool units



Some portable air conditioner units are also able to provide heat by reversing the cooling process so that cool air is collected from a room and warm air is released. These units are not meant to replace actual heaters though and should not be used to cool rooms lower than 50 °F (10 °C).

[edit] Central air conditioning



Central air conditioning, commonly referred to as central air (U.S.) or air-con (UK), is an air conditioning system which uses ducts to distribute cooled and/or dehumidified air to more than one room, or uses pipes to distribute chilled water to heat exchangers in more than one room, and which is not plugged into a standard electrical outlet.



With a typical split system, the condenser and compressor are located in an outdoor unit; the evaporator is mounted in the air handler unit. With a package system, all components are located in a single outdoor unit that may be located on the ground or roof.



Central air conditioning performs like a regular air conditioner but has several added benefits:



* When the air handling unit turns on, room air is drawn in from various parts of the building through return-air ducts. This air is pulled through a filter where airborne particles such as dust and lint are removed. Sophisticated filters may remove microscopic pollutants as well. The filtered air is routed to air supply ductwork that carries it back to rooms. Whenever the air conditioner is running, this cycle repeats continually.



* Because the condenser unit (with its fan and the compressor) is located outside the home, it offers a lower level of indoor noise than a free-standing air conditioning unit.



[edit] Mini (small) duct, high velocity



A central air conditioning system using high velocity air forced through small ducts (also called mini-ducts), typically round, flexible hoses about 2 inches in diameter. Using the principle of aspiration, the higher velocity air mixes more effectively with the room air, eliminating temperature discrepancies and drafts. A high velocity system can be louder than a conventional system if sound attenuators are not used, though they come standard on most, if not all, systems.



The smaller, flexible tubing used for a mini-duct system allows it to be more easily installed in historic buildings, and structures with solid walls, such as log homes. These small ducts are also typically longer contiguous pieces, and therefore less prone to leakage. Another added benefit of this type of ducting is the prevention of foreign particle buildup within the ducts, due to a combination of the higher velocity air, as well as the lack of hard corners.

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